Thursday, 25 April 2019

Terrain Clutter, WW2 Vehicles - Mediterranean Update 10


For the latest update of the book, I have painted a couple of WW2 vehicles and a pile of terrain clutter.

It has been two years since I last painted any vehicles and I felt a bit unsure with my techniques but luckily I remembered John Bond did a couple of tutorials on his excellent blog  http://iagsmgm.blogspot.com/search/label/PAINTING%20TUTORIAL

John's painting tutorial is clear and straight forward and from what I remember a similar style to how I painted vehicles without the use of a spray gun, so I gave some of his methods a try to help ease me back into painting a couple of armoured cars. I also painted a couple of oil drums in the appropriate vehicle colours prior to making a start on the vehicles to make sure I was happy with the colours and help get my hand back in with the weathering techniques.

Terrain clutter is the little things that bring everything together and the more you add the more natural your table will look.

Richard Clarke of 'Too Fat Lardies' fame is a pioneer in the hobby with this sort of thing and has had some good ideas with his terrain whether it be greenhouses and vegetable patches, period posters on the sides of buildings or half sunken barges in his early war canal sections.

My recent list of clutter for this project includes period posters, street, and road signs, telegraph poles (both commercial and scratch built), street lamps, oil drums, crates, and sacks, and some gravestones.

 Combine this with previous extras like civilians, animals, carts, wagons, out-houses and vegetable patches and it all starts to help set the scene. Today's post is set for WW2 Italy, obviously, an earlier Napoleonic Peninsula setting would need to have some of these items removed and replaced with more suitable pieces.

The table had recently been laid for a game of Chain of Command fighting in a built-up area, so I added some of the extras for the photo shoot. Spot the posters.























































At the moment I am painting a Fallschirmjager platoon and supports, then I have a Perry Miniatures plastic box set of US Infantry and a couple of vignettes to paint and that should be it and I can start putting the book altogether.

If you are new to this blog and you are interested in the first book, Setting The Scene - Winter Wargaming, then we now have extra copies in stock so just go to the top right of this page (second box down) and click on 'Setting The Scene' if you want to buy a copy.
                  

    

      

38 comments:

  1. Superb additions: your entire set-up is looking amazing!

    CdlT

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  2. Awesome table, very atmospheric...a fantastic attention to detail as always, congrats!

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  3. Awe inspiring work Pat! Really looking forward to that book!

    Christopher

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  4. Stunning, I could peruse these pictures for hours. So inspiring I can feel the next build coming on.

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  5. Outstanding hobby stuff there. 😀
    I totally agree that a plethora of scatter terrain and small details really tie a table together and make the whole presentation that much more enjoyable. Especially with 28mm.
    Great stuff! 😀

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  6. Gorgeous layout. Simply gorgeous.

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  7. Simply magnificent Pat - this is looking stunning mate and always a pleasure to visit and look at.

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  8. Awesome as always and an endless source of inspiration for me and so many others. It's those little details that often make such a difference and you demonstrate that so well here.

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  9. Lovely and inspiring to want to improve the look my table. In the meantime, just dipping in and browsing all of the pictures is an absolute joy.

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  10. That's so realistic!

    This could be a really good place for quiet days of sunny holidays... but to many traffic at the moment!
    ;-)

    Big Bravo!
    :-)

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  11. Thanks chaps for your kind comments.

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  12. Awesome Pat! Stunning scenery & figures :o)
    The clutter is just the thing to make it all look more 'lived in'
    Cheers
    Matt

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  13. This is brilliantly cinematic. Not my period but very tempted to jump in!
    Must resist...

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  14. Wonderful work Pat! As ever wih your toys and tables it must be pure joy to actually see them in action. Nice also to see a certain Marder II in the background.

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  15. Thanks chaps.
    Nick, that MarderII is my pride and joy thanks to your wonderful painting skill so I will keep it in the background for now as I don't want it stealing all the limelight.
    Cheers,
    Pat.

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  16. Gorgeous work as always! Looking forward to the book, I'm working on my Italian wars terrain but at the speed I go you'll have it published before I'm done!
    Best Iain

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  17. Blimey! You don´t do anything by halves!
    The "slow curves ahead" sign made me smile and I read one sign literally as "Slow dust brings Shell fire" Slow dust? Aha..slow down...doh :-)

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  18. Lovely gaming table Pat, your attention to the added detail is fantastic, really get the feel that to are in a Italian village.
    Thanks for your complements :-)
    cheers John

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  20. Only one suggestion. Take a look at Italian graveyards. There are not simple gravestones. The burials are much more elaborated: statues, crosses, obelisks etcetc. There are also family chapels: buildings in which several members of the same family are buried. This from the modelling point of view. In game terms such a terrain is surely difficult, hard cover, impassable to wheeled vehicles, and bog down risk for tanks.
    Keep on with your great work!
    And waiting for you new book!!

    Marco

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    1. Thanks again chaps for all your comments.
      Thanks Marco for your info on Italian graveyards. I may have to get myself a few of the items you suggest to get the right look.
      Many thanks,
      Pat.

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  21. So amazing, as always! You should advertise on AirBnb, people would come and stay in these places ;-) !!!! Or want to, at any rate!

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  22. Great stuff Pat, those little extras really set a table in its period, weathers its ancients, medieval or ww2.

    Cheers
    Matt

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  23. No hay palabras. Simplemente perfecto. Felicidades.

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  24. Oh my! I need a second Setting the Scene book soon! :D Very inspiring as usual! Any chance you remember the brand of those german infantry?

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    1. Thanks chaps.
      The German and British Infantry are from Perry Miniatures.

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  25. Pat, its always a pleasure to view a new post on your blog. That Tamiya sign set is perfect for 28mm & offers great ideas for typical signage of the time.

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  26. Thanks Terry, the Tamiya set is also excellent value at £7.99 and you get loads of stuff in there.

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  27. I can't think of anything to say except this is amazing and a thing of beauty! Can't wait for the book Pat!

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  28. I'm coming to this a bit late, via TMP. But... Wow! Amazing work. You achieve exactly what I want to achieve, i.e. a beautiful movable diorama level of finish. Interesting to read your profile; my problem is the same - ever-growing untreated piles... of unpainted figures, etc. Only I'm much worse than you. At least you have finished a good deal stuff. Very inspiring. Thanks for sharing.

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